Buying a Home

The 6 Most Essential Homebuyer tips!

Are you ready to stop renting and start owning your own home?  A survy of 400 real estate professionals found that these are the most important tips for homebuyers. Here they are!
1. Get a home inspection to evaluate the safety, overall condition of your new home.
2) Before you start house hunting, get pre-approved for a mortgage loan.
3) Direct all communications with the seller through your real estate agent.
4) Get the seller to put every component of the deal and any verbal agreement into writing.
5) Include important contingencies, such as financing, and property inspections with your offer.
6) Come up with a realistic wish list – what you can afford in terms of house size, neighborhood, and amenities.
But here’s the top property for homebuyers: WORK WITH A REAL ESTATE AGENT!
Real estate agents are…
– Pricing experts! Agents will know if a house is overprices or underpriced.
– Financing Whizzes! Agents can help you understand your many financing options.
– Master Negotiators! Agents can get you the price and terms and conditions you want.
– Skilled House Hunters! Agents know of unlisted homes for sale and have personally visited many listings.
-Paperwork-tacklers! Agents can easily tear through 100 pages of closing documents.
For more tips about home buying, or to schedule a consultation, contact me today!
Your Local Real Estate Expert,
Stephen Nissou
Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty
Direct: 619-250-4541  |   Office: 619-873-2772
Stephen@StephenNissou.com
CalBRE #01443193
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Avoid These 5 First-Time Homebuyer Mistakes

According to the dictionary, a mistake is an error resulting from deficient knowledge or carelessness. While we can’t do anything about carelessness, when it comes to counseling first-time homebuyers, the real estate agent is a tremendous resource to help overcome knowledge deficiency.

That homebuyers lack knowledge about the process only makes sense when you understand that shopping for a home may be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for some. Certainly, it’s not something most Americans do frequently. The process is foreign and the pitfalls are hidden. This is why it’s so important to find the right real estate agent to assist you along the way.

Let’s take a look at some of the most common first-time homebuyer mistakes.

Mistake 1: Not Being Clear About Money

Going into a home purchase with your eyes closed to your finances is probably one of the biggest mistakes you can make during the process. Nobody likes unpleasant surprises, yet that’s what you open yourself up to when you are ignorant about where you stand financially.

If you are unsure about your credit-worthiness, order your credit reports from the three major credit bureaus. By law, Americans are entitled to one free report from each bureau every 12 months. You can order your free reports at AnnualCreditReport.com, the only authorized website, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Look for errors on the reports and dispute any erroneous information. Pay off what you can to help lower your debt-to-income ratio.

Then, see a lender to determine exactly how much you can borrow for a home.

Finally, when you have that figure, don’t be tempted to shop for homes priced at the limit. Give your post-purchase budget some monthly wiggle room by purchasing at the middle of the price range, or a bit more.

Mistake 2: Not Being Clear About Your Wants and Needs

While you may not get everything on a wish list, it’s a good idea to compile one – especially if more than one person will be living in the home.

Understand that your wish list isn’t set in stone and you can plan on it changing once you start viewing homes. During the home-shopping process, you will get a better idea of which items are feasible with your budget and which will have to be struck from the list. Knowing what you want and need in a home is vital to your long-term satisfaction, so it’s worth the time it takes to sit down and make a list.

Don’t neglect the neighborhood wish list either. Do you need to be close to public transportation? If you’d like a family neighborhood with lots of kids for yours to play with, put that on the list.

The bonus to getting clear on your wants and needs is that when you share the list with your real estate agent, your time won’t be wasted by viewing homes that don’t fit your criteria.

Mistake 3: Not Reading the HOA Documents

If the home you decide to make an offer on is managed by a homeowners association, you’ll be presented with a stack of paperwork to read over and approve. These are the HOA documents and, although terribly boring, they hold a wealth of valuable information that you must be privy to before making the final decision to purchase the property.

These documents govern how you can use your home, and they give you an idea of how much and how often your fees might rise. You’ll learn about common and ongoing problems the association deals with and how financially solvent the association is.

Don’t be like the couple that purchased a condo without reading the HOA documents and found out, three days after closing, that they – along with all the other homeowners – were being assessed $7,500 to remedy construction defects.

If you don’t feel that you can read and understand the information in these documents, it’s important to hire an attorney to help you wade through them.

Mistake 4: Making Big Changes

The best part of the home-purchase process is that point during the transaction when inspections are complete, all the contingencies have been removed, and it feels like smooth sailing to the close.

Unfortunately, this is a danger zone for rookie homebuyers. This is typically when they start picturing themselves actually living in the home and the urge may be overwhelming to shop for furniture, appliances and other big-ticket items.

Just before closing, many lenders perform what is known as a “soft pull” of your credit reports. It’s called “soft” because it doesn’t impact your score in any way. It’s the lender’s way of making sure all the circumstances under which it approved the loan haven’t changed.

Any big changes you make, such as large purchases or getting a new job, may derail or delay the purchase. If the new debt you’ve taken on is substantial enough, it may change your debt-to-income ratio and you may be forced to reapply for the mortgage.

Keep your pocketbook closed and remain on your current job until you walk away from the closing table.

Mistake 5: Waiving the Home Inspection

Although foregoing a home inspection was unthinkable a few years ago, in a seller’s market where multiple offers are common, it’s tempting to agree to waive the home inspection as an incentive for the seller to pick your offer. It’s also not very wise.

A professional inspection, even of a newly constructed home, may be the only way you’ll know whether you’re buying a lemon or a plum – a money pit or a smart investment.

When you forego a professional home inspection, you’re essentially buying the home “as is.” Without the inspection contingency, the buyer waives his right to ask for repairs or money to make the repairs.

Waiving the home inspection is never worth the risk.

Knowing how much home you can afford is paramount to a successful home purchase. Making the decision to remain within a certain budget, doing all you can to clean up your credit to get the lowest interest rate possible, and becoming clear on your desires and expectations all help to make the home-buying process as error-free as possible.

Your Local Real Estate Expert,

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Stephen NIssou
Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty
Direct 619-250-4541   |   Office 619-873-2772
Stephen@StephenNIssou.com
http://www.StephenNissou.com
CalBRE # 01443193

Protect Your Home While It’s On The Market

Ready to sell your home? Besides dusting every nook and cranny and pulling weeds from the garden, don’t forget to protect yourself and your home when it’s on the market! Here’s a few ways on how to protect your home while it’s on the market so that you can feel more at ease.

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Hide the Valuables
Don’t keep high-end valuables visible in your home while it’s on the market, including jewelry, collectibles and other items that are easy to steal. Keep a safe in the home with the valuables locked up, or secure a safe deposit box at your local bank to keep them in while your home is for sale. Another thing to hide? Your social security number, bank information, blank checks, prescription medications, and anything else that someone is able to snatch while undetected.

Inform your Neighbors
Had an open house or buyer showing? If you’re not returning home directly after, inform the neighbors to check to be sure the doors were locked in the home. This will keep your home safe from unwanted visitors who know your home is for sale.

Accidental Property Damage
Potential buyers want to know the ins and outs of your home. Many will want to test the appliances and facets for functionality. Will they remember to turn off the gas burners and the bathroom sink? Avoid property damage that’s caused by fires, water damage and other threats by asking your realtor to communicate these concerns to the selling agent. The selling agent can double check to be sure everything is OFF before leaving the property.

Gun Safety and Dog Bites
You might think your gun is well concealed in your bedroom closet or nightstand, but potential buyers will poke around to get an idea of storage space. If you keep a gun in your home, make sure it is unloaded, locked in a gun box and completely out of sight. It will prevent accidental injuries and theft. And if you’re a dog owner? It’s best to remove the dogs from the premises. It will make your home more appealing to non-animal lover and eliminates the threat of dog bites. If you can’t remove your pets from the home, secure a crate that can be placed indoors or out, so that the animal is safely contained during the showings.

Slips, Trips, Falls
If someone gets hurt on your property, they may hold you liable and sue. Since potential buyers aren’t familiar with your home, make sure to prevent inquiries and lawsuits with preventative measures such as; repairing loose and uneven flooring (check porches and decks), remove ice and snow from the walkways and steps, secure rugs with non-slip padding, keep hallways and stairwells clear of clutter, and make sure your home is well lit (both inside and out).

Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,

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Stephen Nissou
Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty
Direct 619-250-4541   |   Office 619-873-2772
E-mail: Stephen@StephenNissou.com
http://www.StephenNissou.com

CalBRE # 01443193

How to Clean and Maintain Your Gutters

Your gutters take care of your house, but who’s taking care of the gutters?

Cleaning and maintaining your gutters is just as important as changing the oil in your car.

Why Gutters Need Cleaning

When your gutters get clogged, you’ll see waterfalls pouring from their edges in warmer weather, and icicles glittering along the bottom in winter. That’s not the worst of it. Improperly cleaned and maintained gutters can lead to:

Water leaks inside your ceiling and adjoining walls: Water exerts a tremendous amount of pressure. Like most things, it will find the path of least resistance. For some homeowners, this spells water damage inside the ceiling and walls (which leads to further problems).

Siding issues: Invading water can lead to mold and rotting wood – not what you want inside your home’s walls. Unfortunately, by the time the damage becomes obvious, it’s typically too late.

Damaged or detached gutters: The weight of waterlogged debris can cause gutter attachments to give, resulting in a fallen gutter.

Basement and foundation damage: Water is relentless. If it doesn’t drain away from your house properly, it can flood the basement or crack the foundation. It won’t get better without repair.

Tips for Cleaning Your Gutters

Most homeowners need to clean their gutters twice a year. First, in October, or when the trees are almost done shedding their leaves. Late spring is another good time, if a second cleaning is needed. If they haven’t been cleaned for a very long time, the job may be more difficult. Keep several tips in mind when cleaning gutters:

Wear leather gloves and long sleeves while cleaning your gutters to protect your hands and arms. You may encounter sharp edges, hidden screw ends, or other hazards.

Spread plastic sheeting over shrubs and decorations you do not want exposed to the cleaning.

Position a wheelbarrow, trash bin, tarp or plastic sheeting on the ground under your work area. Throw the debris onto the tarp instead of carrying a garbage bag up the ladder with you.

Set up your ladder on a stable area near a corner of the house (close to a downspout). Never stand above the third step from the top of a ladder or reach more than a couple of feet to the sides to prevent falling.

Avoid resting the ladder against the gutters. Use standoff stabilizers (ladder horns) to keep the weight off the gutters if needed.

Starting at the corner downspout, work away from it, scooping out any leaves, dirt and debris.

Scrub inside the gutter, if needed, with a soft- or wire-bristled brush.

Flush the gutters, using a garden hose equipped with a spray nozzle in order to create water pressure. Move the water through the gutters and out the downspouts.

Snake any downspout that appears clogged.

Clean the outside of the gutter, using hot, soapy water, and wash away any splatter or spills on the siding.

Gutter Maintenance and Repair

Slow down the debris accumulation in your gutters to make maintenance and cleaning easier. Some repair and maintenance tasks you may be able to perform yourself include the following:

Adjust the gutter slope if water doesn’t flow readily and the downspouts are clear. Gutters should run downhill toward the downspouts at a rate of ¼ inch per 10 feet of travel.

Install mesh screens or a leaf-catching system. If you decide to buy one of these systems, be sure to get a type that can be easily removed when it’s time to clean the gutters.

Check the gutter system every time you clean it. Look for rust, leaks, or loose connections. Watch for signs of water leaks into the house, dry rot of surrounding wood, or other damage.

To fix small holes, leaks or loose connections, use silicone caulk or gutter sealant as directed.

If your house is taller than two stories, consider hiring a professional. Get estimates from three companies before choosing the one you want to work with.

Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,

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Stephen Nissou
NIssou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty – El Cajon
Direct: 619-250-4541  |   Office: 619-873-2772
E-mail: Stephen@StephenNissou.com
http://www.StephenNissou.com
CalBRE # 01443193

Choosing a Kitchen Sink to Match Your Style and Budget

If you’re remodeling your kitchen on a budget – or equipping a new kitchen and haven’t a clue where to start – focus on the kitchen sink. Yesteryear’s limited selection of cast iron and stainless steel can’t compete with today’s stylish, modern sinks.

Simply choose the mounting type and style, then select the material. A new sink will transform your kitchen.

Kitchen Sink Mounting Types and Design Options

In general, your kitchen sink will either rest above or attach beneath the kitchen counter. Understanding installation types, styles and terminology will help you find the sink you really want.

Surface-Mounted Sinks: Surface-mounted sinks drop into a hole made in the kitchen countertop. If the sink is rimmed, it features an exposed flange that meets and seals to the countertop. Self-rimming sinks, on the other hand, lack the flat flange, using rounded outer edges to rest on the countertop instead. Both are fairly simple to install and work with most countertop materials.

Under-Mounted Sinks: For a kitchen countertop that looks seamless, consider an under-mounted kitchen sink. The countertop still features a cutout to accommodate the sink, but instead of dropping through the counter, it mounts to the underneath. The effect is a sleek counter surface. It’s considered a low-maintenance design that looks especially good with modern interiors. Under-mounted sinks work best with solid counter materials like stone and concrete, not moisture-permeable countertops like laminate.

Tile-In Sinks: As the name suggests, a tile-in sink is surrounded by a tile countertop. The sink drops into a hole, like a surface-mounted sink. The difference is the height: Once the tile is installed, the sink rim is actually flush with the surrounding countertop. This makes cleaning the countertop a breeze and calls attention to the beauty of your tile, rather than the sink basin.

Integral Sinks: Some people mistakenly call these “Corian sinks,” but Corian is just one integral sink and counter manufacturer. Integral sinks are made of the same material as the countertop and fused to it, presenting a seamless appearance that’s also easy to keep clean.

Farmhouse Sinks: Another popular kitchen sink style is the farmhouse sink. Rather than referring to how the sink mounts, it’s a design that features a front apron panel. It’s a stylish look that highlights the sink itself. Farmhouse sinks may be under- or surface-mounted, and even tiled-in.

How Many Bowls Do You Need?

Bigger isn’t always better. When selecting your new kitchen sink, consider the size of your kitchen and your work habits before settling on a bowl size or number. Most sink styles are available in single and double bowls, and sometimes triple as well. One bowl may be smaller than the others, especially with triple bowls, which often sandwich a smaller bowl between two larger ones.

Single-bowl sinks work best for smaller kitchens (less than 150 square feet). Triple bowls are the ultimate luxury, allowing you to stack dishes to dry, have dishes soaking, and still peel vegetables in the third basin.

Sink Materials

Stainless Steel – Stainless steel is easy to clean, reasonably priced, and strong. Look for the gauge (thickness) of the steel and the sound-deadening ability. The lower the gauge, the thicker the steel, making it more durable. Spray coatings and special pads on the bottom of the sink reduce noise. Choose a satin finish, rather than a mirror finish, to lessen scratching. Look for varying bowl shapes for added style.

Cast Iron – Cast iron sinks are coated with enamel and come in a variety of colors. Cast iron is heavy, but a bigger issue is that it chips and scratches easily. Exposed iron will rust, requiring replacement or repair. Also, cast iron doesn’t keep water hot for very long. It’s favored for the glossy finish and stain resistance. Use cast iron with farmhouse sink styles for authenticity.

Composite – Composite sinks encompass three specific types: quartz composite, polyester/acrylic composite and granite-based composite. Of these, the polyester/ acrylic composites are more budget-friendly and provide a shiny look. Quartz composite sinks are more durable. Composed of 70 percent quartz and 30 percent resin filler, they resist damage and also come in various colors and finishes. Granite-based sinks are a higher-end choice and offer the greatest scratch and chemical resistance of any sink material.

Take your time when shopping for your new kitchen sink. Look online and at various stores to get ideas and find the sink you’ll love.

Check out our Pinterest page  to see sinks we love! http://www.Pinterest.com/NissouRealty

Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,

Stephen Nissou
Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty – El Cajon
619-250-4541 DIRECT   |   619-873-2772 OFFICE
Email: Stephen@StephenNissou.com
http://www.StephenNissou.com
CalBRE # 01443193

Just Listed in Alpine, CA! 3 Homes on 1 Lot!

Home off Japatul Rd in Alpine, CA, 91901!

3 Homes on an 11.5 acre lot!
Offered at: $375,000 – $419,000
Rare Find!! Zoned A72 and Duplex. 3 homes on a 11.5 acre lot! Cute 3 bed, 2 bath home and an adorable single story house with a beautiful setting to enjoy the quiet and the beautiful views! Unit B is a 2bed/1bath double wide, currently rented for $700/month but valued at $1295. The 3rd home is a 1 bed/1bath single wide. All homes are private and placed apart from the others. Build your dream home on the lot!
2nd lot next door is also available, See MLS #150009041. Package deal for both is $560,000.
To schedule a private viewing of these homes, and for additional information, please contact Stephen Nissou today!
Direct: 619-250-4541
Office; 619-873-2772
E-mail: Stephen@StephenNissou.com
Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,
Stephen NissouNissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty – El Cajon
619-250-4541 Direct  |   619-873-2772 Office
Stephen@StephenNissou.com
http://www.StephenNissou.com
CalBRE # 01443193

Home For Sale in Old Rancho San Diego!

Turnkey ready home for sale in Old Rancho San Diego! A 1 story, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,881 sf home with 3 car garage with plenty of parking in the driveway for guests. Granite countertops in kitchen with fresh paint. Community features 2 pools, basketball courts, tennis courts, and two parks! Elementary and High School are within walking distance. This is a great home to raise a family and is on a quiet street. Downtown La Mesa, Target, 24 Hour Fitness, Edwards Cinema, Sushi, Italian, Mediterranean, and many more restaurants nearby.

Seller is entertaining offers between $399,000 – $449,000.

For more information, and to schedule a time to view the property, please contact Stephen Nissou today!
Direct: 619-250-4541
Office: 619-873-2772
Email: Stephen@StephenNissou.com
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Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,
Stephen NIssou
Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty
Direct: 619-250-4541
Office: 619-873-2772
Stephen@StephenNissou.com
CalBRE # 01443193

How To Be A Respectful Home Buyer

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When a home is on the market, the seller’s privacy goes out the window. It is almost guaranteed that some buyers will open drawers, peek inside cabinets and touch items that are obviously personal and not included in the sale.

Coming home from work to find that the impeccably-made bed you left in the morning is now covered in a ball of linens is obviously annoying. Constant requests to extend deadlines, lists of demands and nitpicking the condition of the home are not only time consuming and insulting, but they do nothing to endear the buyer to the seller.

These are just a few examples of homebuyers behaving badly. Depending on the market, however, buyers are not necessarily in the driver’s seat. During periods of multiple offers and heavy investor involvement, it’s important for buyers to be on their best behavior. So, dear homebuyer, read on to learn how to not turn off the seller of your potential dream home.

The Time Bandits

Savvy home sellers spend a great deal of time ensuring that the home is presentable during the marketing period. They clean, de-clutter, and then inconvenience themselves by skedaddling before any potential buyers show up. Buyers that cancel appointments at the last minute, or just don’t bother to show up, are behaving quite badly.

Unless an emergency came up, and there was no time to call your agent or the seller, try to provide the seller with at least several hours’ notice that you won’t be arriving to tour the home. It’s the polite thing to do, and it just might save the seller from needlessly preparing for your arrival.

“Time is of the essence” is a phrase that you’ll see in most real estate purchase contracts. What it means is that all specified deadlines in the agreement are mandatory – well, sort of. Yes, you can request the extension of a date and it will most likely be granted, if the reason for the request is compelling enough.

Frivolous requests, however, or those made repeatedly, are big time wasters. Sellers are frequently on a tight schedule to get the transaction to the closing table. Just as you are excited to get into your new home, the seller has plans as well. Keeping contract deadline extension requests to a minimum is one way you can contribute to a smooth transaction.

Then there is the homebuyer that, once the ink dries on the contract, treats the home as if it’s unoccupied and equipped with a revolving door. One week it’s an interior decorator that needs access to take measurements, then, perhaps, the next week it will be the architect. Many buyers want to show family members their new home – before it is actually their new home.

The seller, in the meantime, is packing for the move, having repairs completed, accommodating the appraiser and inspectors – all while attempting to live a normal life. Additional home tours are more than an inconvenience, they are time stealers.

If you must gain access to the home, ask your agent to find out when the inspector or appraiser will be there and arrange to visit at the same time.

The Nitpickers

Nitpicking is neither a successful price-reduction nor negotiating strategy, as buyers who have tried it can likely attest. Bankrate.com’s Dana Dratch calls these buyers “gladiator wannabes,” who, after they’ve agreed to purchase a home, come in with a long list of things that are wrong with it, or a list of concessions.

The art of negotiating depends on give and take – not a barrage of one-sided demands. Let your real estate agent do the negotiating. If you truly feel that something that is wrong with the house commands a price reduction, your agent should be able to justify it with a list of comparables and reasons why the home doesn’t stack up.

The Unprepared

There are several reasons why a real estate agent will suggest that a buyer get fully approved for a loan before submitting an offer. Buyers that don’t take this important step will run the risk of derailing the entire transaction.

Even a pre-approval commitment from a lender isn’t firm. Once the loan application is in the hands of the underwriter, anything can happen. Many times, a buyer will receive a letter from the bank – in the middle of a transaction – listing all the conditions that must be met before the loan is approved. Satisfying these conditions not only takes time, but, depending on the conditions, may result in a cancelled sale.

Take the time to work with your lender to ensure that you will get the loan before committing to purchase a home. Don’t make any major purchases until the home closes escrow. Entering into the process knowing that you’ll get the loan is not only a courtesy to the seller, but the peace of mind it will give you is priceless.

Both parties in a real estate transaction have schedules that need to be accommodated during the purchase process and, of course, sellers can behave badly as well. (We’ll take a look at that in a future article). Respecting each other’s needs helps make the transaction run smoother and more comfortably for all concerned.

For more tips about home buying, connect with me on Social Media!
Facebook.com/NissouRealty

Twitter.com/NissouRealty

Instagram.com/NissouRealtyGroup

Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,
Stephen Nissou

Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty
680 Fletcher Pkwy. El Cajon, CA 92020
Direct 619-250-4541  |   Office 619-873-2772

Stephen@StephenNissou.com

http://www.StephenNissou.com

CalBRE # 01443193

Condo For Sale in Rancho San Diego!

12191 Cuyamaca College, #811, El Cajon, CA 92019

2 Bed, 2 Bath, 834 sf.
$229,000 – $239,000
Get a piece of Rancho San Diego before it’s too late! Freshly painted downstairs 2 bedroom luxury condo in the heart of RSD! This is a great starter home, retirement home, or rental property. A highly desirable neighborhood with a beautiful open air feel, unline many other condo associations. Turn key ready – should I say more?  All appliances included, with central A/C, Granite and stainless steel appliances. 2 parking spaces!
Close to Edwards Cinema, Target, Sushi, Italian, Starbucks, Mexican restaurants, and much more! Close to freeways and schools.
For more information, and to schedule a viewing, please contact Stephen Nissou!
Direct: 619-250-4541
Office: 619-873-2772
E-mail: Stephen@StephenNissou.com
Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,
Stephen Nissou
Nissou Realty Group   |   Keller Williams Realty
619-250-4541   |   619-873-2772
Stephen@StephenNissou.com

Rent to Own

Renting to own (also known as a lease-option) provides those not in the position to make an immediate purchase on a home, to settle on something that is right for them- at the right time. Many lease options are the same.

Typically, renters agree to lease the house for a pre-determined amount of time (usually one to three years) with an up-front fee with or without an elevated monthly rent. The potion over market goes into a  “fund” that is utilized later as a down payment. They provide the opportunity to lock the price in when the deal is made, with the option to purchase at that price when or before the lease is up.

Timing is everything. Market conditions play a critical factor into finding a lease-option. When the market is steady, it makes it difficult to find these options unless the owner really needs to sell. However, as homes sit on the market longer, sellers begin losing money which causes the window for lease-options to open to potential and future home buyers.

Lease-options typically favor the buyer, but can be complicated to those that are unfamiliar with them. Have a real estate broker and attorney inspect the contract to ensure there is financial protection as well as security. Lease options can be a smart solution to throwing away money when you rent. First time home buyers who play their cards correctly can eliminate conventional loans and get that chance at their dream of homeownership.

Your Local San Diego Real Estate Expert,

Stephen Nissou

Nissou Realty Group
Keller Williams Realty – El Cajon

619-250-4541   |  Stephen@StephenNissou.com
http://www.StephenNissou.com